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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
" there are seven states currently considered by the associated press to be true toss ups: nevada, colorado, iowa, ohio, virginia, florida and new hampshire. it shows each candidate's quickest potential path to 270 electoral votes. including one scenario giving president obama a path to victory, winning nevada and ohio, to get to 277 electoral votes. for mitt romney the path could also lead through ohio, and blanketing the south, to get to 281 in a different scenario. and there are also several potentials for a tie. this one shows the president losing nevada but winning ohio, to get to 269 for both candidates. and late today, the "newshour" got word that romney will make a last-minute stop in pennsylvania over the weekend. we explore the race and the states in play with jonathan martin of politico and margaret talev of bloomberg news. welcome to you both. so let me start with you, jonathan. the president's back on the trail today. what is the state of this race? how do two campaigns see it? >> both are projecting confidence because that's what you do when you're four days out from election day, j
on this map is go ahead and take a look. you can see california has 9.7% unemployment. nevada has 11.2%. florida has 8.6%. you can go dive in on a state-by-state level as well. finally we've also got a lot of demographic data in here. this, for example, is a breakdown as how the country looks by ethnicity. the more pink, the larger hispanic population. new mexico has 46%. texas has 37%. these are just some of the data sets. whether it's demographic or economic or historical or a little bit of context that you like from the newshour so much. we'll be back. >> ifill: we'll be playing with those maps all night. we can't wait. all of those factors will play into state and local races across this country. back to jeff now now for a closer look at the house and senate contest on radar tonight. >> brown: still with me are christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. let's set the big-picture scene on the senate side. of course it's about control in both houses, right? >> sure, it is. at the beginning of this cycle, republicans felt confident that they might be able to win the necessary seats
. within a few years you have swing state, maybe not even swing state, new mexico, nevada, texas starts becoming a swing state. >> a blue state. >> the trends are so damn obvious, but they walk the other way. >> woodruff: so the campaign, the rest of the campaign, mark, jobs numbers out today. but how doe this fit in and where does this stand. >> don't pop the champagne. we're a long way from five percent but i mean the jobs numbers were better than expected which is always good. and they were increased from both august and september. they were higher. and with rising house prices, home prices, and confidence and optimistic index being highest, the hghest in five years, this is all encouraging news. i mean it's not determinive news but all encouraging news for an incumbent. >> woodruff: does it affect the campaign, do you think? >> i'm not sure the last jobs numbers have a huge effect. in 1992 george h.w. bush had bigger jobs numbers. he had really significant growth. people used the economy had will be been locked. nonetheless the last couple of weeks of the campaign, you have to say t
of stops in nevada, colorado, and iowa. romney's day won't end until midnight after an election eve rally in manchester, new hampshire. >> woodruff: late monday in a surprise move romney announced he will hit the trail one final time tomorrow touching down on election day in both pennsylvania and ohio. margar talked with romney's communications director, gail gitcho, about the campaign's micro-targeting "get out the vote" effort, called the orca project, named for the killer whale. find that video online. >> ifill: coming up, we'll have much more on the end to the campaign, including the final push in ohio; state of the race analysis from rothenberg, page, and kohut; voter access to polling places, and initiatives on the ballot; plus, the slow recovery after the storm, and a day in the life of a hard-hit brooklyn neighborhood. but first, with the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> woodruff: the violence in syria swept up a new group today. fiting raged near a palestinian refugee camp in southern damascus. activists said palestinian radicals supporting the syrian government
in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada, something good could happen for them. but it's going to be hard for the democrats to take over the house. >> brown: there a particul one or two you want to keep your eye on especially tonight? >> a lot of the demographic data we're looking atic democratshave area where's they can gain, perhaps later on down the line, arizona, texas, as sturks mentioned, florida is another one, wherehe democrats are look at making long-lastinge gains. they're making new seats. california is another one we will be atching. what is the bigger picture when it comes to the type of members ofat ngress?s? are these peopl extreme on one part or the other? the way the lines are drawn that can happen. if you draw a district with metreme democrat or republican, you can end up with extremestr n congress. >> woodruff: mark, you were telling me you were off the set talking to somebody, picking up some information about howthe vote is coming in. >> the turnout right now that what tino voters are voting at the levels that the obama people needed, if no
, may have given them the margin of victory in colorado, nevada, and virginia glaen glen when the latino voters turned out, 71% of them voted for the president. ray suarez, thank you for all your good work from chicago. >> suarez: thanks a lot, gwen. >> woodruff: we'll devote much of the rest of the program to the events of last night and the coming days including what worked and what didn't; what the voters endorsed what's ahead in the president's second term. plus, shields and brooks. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street had its worst day of the year, amid worries about continuing divided government in washington and bad news out of europe. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 313 points to close at 12,932. the nasdaq fell 74 points to close at 2,937. for more on what happened, i spoke earlier with economist hugh johnson, who runs his own investment services company in albany, new york. so, mr. johnson, tell me, how do we distribute the weight of what's pull the market down? is it the fears in europe? is it the fears about t
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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